Five Do’s and Five Don’ts for Young Creative Writers

Creative writing often appeals to teenage students, who enjoy the opportunity to create and control their own worlds and the chance to voice their own ideas. Besides, what teenage writer has not at some point fancied him or herself the author of the next great American novel? Though seeking fame is hardly the motivation we … Continue reading Five Do’s and Five Don’ts for Young Creative Writers

Ten Tips for Helping Your Students with Schoolwork

I don't need to remind anyone that in recent months, many parents have found themselves the recipients of a new job title: teacher. 2020 has not been generous. For those of you suddenly homeschooling your students, or finding that remote learning simply doesn't happen without you jumping in as instructor-motivator-planner-encourager, these tips that I've collected … Continue reading Ten Tips for Helping Your Students with Schoolwork

“Stop Putting Cheetos in His Hat”: Establishing Proper Authority in the Classroom

Classroom management is a part of teaching that we as teachers often dread. Despite five years of running an ordered classroom, I still have nightmares about teaching students who won’t listen to me. Inevitably, my dream-self begins shouting to be heard above all the ruckus; inevitably, the dream ends in anarchy and failure.  I am … Continue reading “Stop Putting Cheetos in His Hat”: Establishing Proper Authority in the Classroom

Classroom Discussions: “There Are No Wrong Answers” Is the Wrong Answer

“In this discussion, all opinions are equal. It doesn’t matter what your opinion is--there are no wrong answers.” Haven’t we all heard this? Teachers use the above concept to preface all kinds of conversations and assignments.  I can not actually say that I haven't: I would hope that I haven't, but sometimes in flustered, blushing … Continue reading Classroom Discussions: “There Are No Wrong Answers” Is the Wrong Answer

Even Accomplished Scholars: A Teacher’s Thoughts on the Limits of Education

My Dear Students,  After eight posts which emphasize the importance of education, I find it a fitting time to temper my enthusiasm for education by saying this: it is better to be uneducated and love God than to be an accomplished scholar and despise wisdom. Of course, uneducated people can certainly despise wisdom, and educated … Continue reading Even Accomplished Scholars: A Teacher’s Thoughts on the Limits of Education